The Railway Army Of 1894 Analysis

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The document of “The Railway Army of 1894”, focuses on management of industries. Subordination allows managers to observe how well employees follow instruction. It is comparable to the saying “when I say jump, you say how high”. If the employees pursue this method, they would be the strongest industry. In fact, Marshall M. Kirkman writes “labor, to exist at all, must act in harmony with those who give it employment, and in due subordination to the interest of society as a whole” (Johnson, 43), meaning, employees and employers must work respectfully amongst each other, in order to create a harmonious environment. The document also elaborates on the balance between the amount of money the company pays employees, how many hours they work, and…show more content…
This age in time was entirely about monopolies and hard work. However, during, this time monopolies were extremely competitive and greedy. Henry Demarest Lloyd manifests in his book “Commonwealth” that working against each other often got in the way of the work they were trying to accomplish. The countries vast moneymakers all appeared in the same generation and all wanted to be king of industry. The men who composed the monopolies, were undeniably highly intelligent, but they had an even bigger desire for competition. This is proof as to why they are called monopolies. They will do anything as long as they destroy other companies to make their own company succeed. The Sugar Trust Act, was capable to close or open any industry they requested; this is a great example of a monopoly. The Sugar Trust industry had authority over multiple smaller industries. During this time, the middle class could not afford the products, like sugar, that these industries sold. The middle class was being wiped out. Soon enough, new acts were being introduced, making monopolies…show more content…
Many workers, not far from Thomas O’Donnell, got laid off during business slumps by being replaced with handy machinery, or a worker with a lower wage. This was cheaper and more efficient. This left numerous workers without a job, especially when being replaced by a machine. Thomas O’Donnell, an ex-mule spinner, located in mills in Fall River, Massachusetts, testified before the U.S Senate about the relationship between labor and capital. In this document, O’Donnell reenacts his trial on the labor market. He started working at a remarkably young age to start forming a living. He received no education, thus he lived by his common knowledge. He got married and had two kids, ages three and one. He has always worked at the mill by the river with a pay of $1.50 a day. Later on, after the workers went on strike, three years before he testified, he got cut down to part time. He worked thirteen weeks since Thanksgiving, which is about seventy-eight days, equalling $117 a year. This was less than he would usually produce working full time. Working full time allowed him to work fifteen weeks a year, foraging about $133. He paid a weekly amount of $1.50 for his small house, and had to conserve every other penny for necessary needs. He would frequently hunt for clams to feed his family and would gather wood by the shore. He would obtain bread and meat here and there, but sometimes had no food
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