The Rat Man Analysis

935 Words4 Pages
The story begins with the main character, Thomas, trapped in solitary confinement. The Assistant Director Janson, also known as Rat Man by the gladers, removes him from his chamber. They are offered the chance to restore their memories which have been temporarily disabled by WICKED, so that they can continue with their efforts to find the cure to the Flare. All but three of the gladers decide not to restore their memories, but are later punished and forced to receive the removal surgery. Before the surgery, they manage to escape and learn that their friends, Brenda and Jorge, worked for WICKED. The five of them escape in a Berg, a transport vehicle, and go to Denver looking for a man called Hans, who can take out their chips, now that they…show more content…
He joins up with his friends and the Right Arm in their plan to infiltrate WICKED. Once he returns to WICKED, he finds that Assistant Director Janson plans on completing the cure by examining Thomas’s brain structure- but in the process, it will end up killing Thomas. Before the lethal surgery, Thomas plants the device that will disable all of WICKED’s security. He is forced to start the procedure just as the Right Arm’s troops invade the facility. Thomas wakes up from the surgery and realizes that the procedure was not completed. He finds a note from the Chancellor of WICKED, saying that they already have enough resources to complete the cure, but there is a disagreement on how to continue. She states that WICKED has fallen, and the location of a “safe place” where Thomas can bring all of the Immunes that WICKED used in their trials. Once he locates the others, they find that the Right Arm does not intend to take over the WICKED’s research; they intend to destroy it. As the facility explodes and crumbles, Thomas and the Immunes escape the…show more content…
In this novel, Thomas escapes solitary confinement to aid the Right Arm, a organization determined on bringing down WICKED. Thomas ends up in many unexpected predicaments, most of which are exciting and intense adventures and journeys. Although it is the most interesting part of the series, I would highly suggest reading the other books in the series first. None of the stories in the trilogy are worth missing, and reading them all in order really pays off; by the third novel, the narrator and characters talk about subjects that were brought up and introduced in the earlier books. If you want to or have watched the movies that were made after the trilogy, but have not read the book series yet, I would suggest only reading the first novel, The Maze Runner. After the first movie on The Maze Runner, they barely follow the plot line of the novels, so if your only motive is to read the books to understand the movies, the least you could read to still understand the movies would be The Maze Runner. I would also strongly recommend reading the trilogy in order, since certain parts will make more sense once read in chronological order. Overall, people who enjoy adventure and suspense would thoroughly enjoy the series, and most especially the third novel, The Death
Open Document