The Reality Of Reality In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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There are many times in life where there is simply nothing one can possibly do about a particular problem and constantly worry about it, causing one to have the mindset of escaping the reality of life. While one may struggle to find the success of facing reality, there is rather a decision that can be made. People tend to think of “romance” when romanticism is brought up, however, love may be a subject of Romantic art. Romanticism is the movement in which arts and literature were used to emphasize inspiration, subjectiveness, and the authority of an individual. In the novel “Frankenstein,” Mary Shelley tells a story of a promising young doctor whose name is Victor Walton. Victor Walton was devastated by the death of his mother during childbirth,…show more content…
The idea of facing reality and not giving up is something that John Keat illustrates in his poem while he also speaks about the versions of reality that we live upon as human beings. In his poem “Ode to a Nightingale,” Keat provides a brief comparison of what life is like as a dream and what it is like in reality. The speaker says, “That I might drink, and leave the world unseen,/And with thee fade away into the forest dim:” (Lines 19-20) to indicate that he wants to escape from reality, but finds it to be unsatisfying. When the speaker says “fade away into the forest dim:” it is to reader understanding that life is not always perfect and the way we want it to be. There will always be darkness hidden behind the light of a “perfect” life, however, the darknesses and challenges help one become stronger as a result. Facing the reality of life even when one is to “escape from reality,” simply shows that a person is not willing to try and face the results of failure; one who does not appreciate life enough. In addition to face challenges and the nature of reality, the idea of living life to the fullest potential is
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