The Reformation Influence

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Luther’s theology marked a break with the Roman Catholic Church, because he was greatly disturbed by their act of selling indulgences. Indulgences were grants made by the pope that excused the time of temporary punishment in purgatory. He instigated his rebellion against the Catholic Church by attacking John Tetzel, a priest and commissioner of indulgences. Luther nailed his Ninety-Five Theses, which claimed selling indulgences as an unfaithful practice, on the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church. Luther never had the intention to defy or overthrow the Church. However, he felt obligated to confront the Church and its many false teachings. Many Germans became followers of Luther because of his presentation of individualism in religion. He emphasizes the significance of practicing personal faith rather than being devoted to the…show more content…
Firstly, annihilating the unity of religion in Europe resulted in the division of Christendom into Catholic and Protestant. It weakened the Church and its oppressive clergy, while restoring the pure form of early Christianity. Additionally, the Reformation helped to separate the Church and state. Secondly, empowering monarchs by sacrificing church officials facilitated the movement towards the modern centralized worldly state. Although absolute monarchy was a significant factor of political liberty, Protestantism also contributed to this growth. Thirdly, the Reformation developed the contemporary idea of equality. For example, Luther promoted that the clergy and laity are all equal on a spiritual level. Lastly, the Reformation stressed on individual conscience over the decisions of the Church. Protestants were determined on individual rights being the source of authority and judgement. This took part in the development of capitalism, which laid the foundation of today's
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