Karl Marx And Max Weber: A Critical Analysis

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During the late 19th century and early 20th century, capitalism was thriving. Individuals who were previously victims of the aristocracy under feudalism gained power with the dramatic development of the market system. This allowed for the bourgeoisie, or the merchant class, to take the leading role within society, and manipulate the other class, the proletariat, for their benefit. Like all of history, though, class conflict continued, despite the remarkable change in societal organization. Scholars were fascinated by the effect this change had on society, and many feared it would fundamentally destroy it, because of the great power it gave to the merchant class. Karl Marx and Max Weber are two scholars who examine capitalism’s development and…show more content…
Baxter builds on the Puritan idea of how “work, and work alone, banishes religious doubt and gives certainty for one’s status among the saved” (Weber, 125). He makes revisions to this ideology by explaining how if an individual engages in work methodically, then he is awarded God’s favor. Methodical work provides order in life and in society, enforcing individuals’ focus on God’s majesty and the commandments. Due to this, God assists those that engage in methodical work. Individuals achieve success with God’s helping hand, and His assistance suggests grace upon the individual, which can provide some insight on the state of an individual’s salvation. God’s assistance with systematic work, which is incredibly difficult, especially for long periods of time, suggests the importance of the individual as someone who can contribute to God’s kingdom. Baxter identifies how the wealth gained by an individual is not his own, but it is that of the God’s kingdom, because God assisted him in acquiring it. “The world exists, and only exists, to serve the glorification of God,” so an individual’s responsibility is to provide the wealth he has generated for the betterment of God’s kingdom to demonstrate His glory (Weber, 122). It is only through engagement in work, though, that an individual is able to receive some insight on his salvation, so…show more content…
There is no connection to the values that individuals followed during the 18th century nor a connection to salvation, which was significant during the 16th century. People are trapped within capitalism, and they must work because capitalism requires it. The transformed society is a “steel-hard casing,” meaning that material goods have acquired an “inescapable power over the people,” (Weber,
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