The Role Of Blame In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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When devastation occurs, someone must take the burden of responsibility, with or without their own consent. The catastrophes that take place throughout Frankenstein develop in response to a single character’s decisions and actions on those decisions. Two characters in particular have warranted the blame by their actions alone. However, the blame absolutely lies with Victor Frankenstein and his decision to create life in order to bring meaning to his mother’s death. Frankenstein’s desire to possess forbidden knowledge lessened the pain he felt after his mother’s death. His uncontrollable grief contributed to the frantic rush in which Frankenstein created his monster, leaving it hideously mismatched and enormous. “Many of Frankenstein’s faults are evident in the appearance of his creation” (Creator’s). Frankenstein built Creature using dead and decaying body parts that added horror to the already terrifying size of the monster, easily allowing judgement of Creature’s character just based on his outward appearance. Creature’s looks inhibited his capability of fitting into society despite his civilized manner. In his solitude, Creature built up the hatred he possessed for Frankenstein for giving him such an ungodly appearance, denying him a positive place in the social order. The same looks horrified Frankenstein to the extent of abandoning Creature to live on his own,…show more content…
Without Frankenstein’s knowledge on how to create life from death, Creature would not exist to cause him so much pain. Frankenstein shows his irresponsibility when he ignores the existence of the being he created. Creature possesses no control over his own creation or the fact his “father” neglected to teach him the ways of the world. Frankenstein deserved to be punished for his lack of compassion towards his
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