The Role Of Discrimination In John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

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In the book Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck Lennie and George go to Soledad to work on a ranch. George and Lennie are migrant workers that are trying to get a farm for themselves. This is hard for them because Lennie is disabled and seems to always be getting in trouble. When they -- George and Lennie -- are at the ranch, they and the reader experience lots of racial discrimination towards African Americans. One of the people that gets discriminated in the book is Crooks. Crooks is an African American that gets mistreated because of race. There are a few examples that the author really highlights, when we find out that Crooks is living away from all of the white men, nobody comes to visit him, and he gets referred to by the other men with racist slurs. He also works by himself on jobs that are difficult to him since his was crippled by a horse. There are some striking…show more content…
This is significant, because the boss gave Crooks hell even though he didn’t do anything to “deserve it.” This is convincing me that there is discrimination in the book, even from only the start, because neither George or Lennie are given hell for being late. I don’t know if the boss usually does it, or if it was just in this part, but it definitely impacts the book, even from just the state
All in all, there is a lot of discrimination in the book. As I showed you, there are many instances where this discrimination is shown. Crooks suffers from discrimination. The book gives examples that show us that at this time, people didn’t realize that differences make us special. There are also other people in the book that are discriminated, but they are discriminated nearly as much as Crooks is. I think that it is unlawful, even at this time period. Discrimination is for people don’t know that differences make us
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