The Role Of Guilt In Macbeth

1494 Words6 Pages
All throughout history, people have wondered if it is possible to bury guilt down deep inside and forget about a horrible deed. The feeling of guilt and its overbearing weight can be seen in all sorts of cases, but particularly when dealing with illegal or societally unacceptable behavior. An ordinary man in the community, who is in good standing, does his duties and is seen as a good overall guy is generally thought of as innocent; someone who would not ever commit a crime because they have no weird vibe coming from them. A typical man will most likely live a normal life without causing any trouble, but sometimes, a man may shock himself by carrying out a lawless act and will feel remorseful. When an innocent man commits a crime for the first…show more content…
56). Here, Lady Macbeth calls Macbeth unmanly to push him into the act. He decides to go through with the murder and is shocked at himself for having the ambition to go through with the horrible deed. After he kills Duncan, he comes home paranoid and states, “I’ll go no more. I am afraid what I have done. Look on't again I dare not” (2.2 65-67). This quote shows how troubled Macbeth is at his actions and how he wishes he had not done it. If a man thinks of himself as good, then he will struggle severely with the inner feeling of guilt. Another instance of guilt is shown in the story “Tell Tale Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe. The story begins with an anonymous author convincing the audience he is not going insane. He states “TRUE! --nervous --very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses --not destroyed --not dulled them.” The author is telling the audience that he simply has very acute senses and that is why he is so nervous and jumpy all the time. The reason why he is justifying his nervousness is because he has committed the murder of an old man who he lives with. Although little information is given about the author, it is clear that he has no experience with murder and is…show more content…
Many people think that it is possible to hide guilt even if a person has a good conscience because they think that once the crime has been committed, they will cope with the guilt by forgetting it ever happened or pushing it down. Eventually, however, in an effort to reach out and end the internal conflict, little outbursts or confessions start to occur. These outbursts happen because they are trying to reach out. For example, in the play Macbeth, Macbeth is crowned king after murdering King Duncan and has also murdered his best friend, Banquo, for being suspicious of his actions. At his coronation dinner, Macbeth sees Banquo’s ghost sitting in his spot at the dinner table and he yells “Avaunt, and quit my sight! Let the earth hide thee.” (3.4. 113). Nobody except Macbeth can see the ghost, so to the guests, he appears to be losing his mind and his true inner feelings are beginning to shine through. He later says to Lady Macbeth, “Can such things be and overcome us like a summer’s cloud...When now I think you can behold such sights and keep the natural ruby in your cheeks when mine are blanched with fear.” (3.4. 135-141). Macbeth is talking to Lady Macbeth and tells her how he does not know how to let go of his murder and asks her how it is possible for her to forget about the situation. This excerpt also explains how Macbeth’s murders haunt
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