The Role Of Knowledge In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein carries a multitude of deep and pressing themes. When explored, one can ponder and consider many of the controversial issues that plague the world today. In the novel, Victor Frankenstein uses acquired knowledge to create an intelligent, emotional, and cunning creature. However, Victor becomes an arrogant and selfish individual, and by foolishly ignoring the circumstances of his scientific actions, ultimately causes the death of his entire family. In the process, the theme of utilized knowledge is explored heavily within Victor and the creature. Frankenstein proves that in a given circumstance, whether or not knowledge is a gift or a curse depends not only on how one uses it, but also how one treats the resulting responsibility of gained knowledge.…show more content…
After his creation, the being stumbles through a harsh wilderness, receiving cruel encounters from both his maturing senses and local villagers. He stops at a particularly interesting farm, which is home to the De Lacey family. There he watches for an extended period of time, and learns the skill of language. He observes the human practices of love, mercy, and togetherness. Relishing in his discovery, the creature explains, “I had admired the perfect forms of my cottagers- their grace, beauty, and delicate complexions,” (Shelley 80). Here, his experience with newfound knowledge is entirely positive. He uses his new understanding of human emotion to better himself, for he feels that he can be accepted by society if he can become more human. As a result, the reader can see a more human aspect of the being’s
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