The Role Of The American Dream In The Great Gatsby

1078 Words5 Pages
As children, we have all dreamt of money, being rich; owning an extravagant mansion, magnificent cars, and being married to a prince or princess. Basically, we dream of the perfect life, with the perfect spouse. Generally, this dream is known as the American Dream, which is the belief that if one works hard, that person will succeed by becoming rich. Even after all the clarifications for the American Dream, people have still managed to misunderstand it. The deceptive role of the American Dream, the wrongfully understood meaning of it and the changes it brings in a person is what puts together the overall idea of American Dream. The American dream disguises itself as a deception that will lead to nothing but the complete opposite of what it means. Fitzgerald was clearly addressing an issue he saw in his time and an issue that he thought would be present in the future, he was addressing the fact that people started to mistake the American Dream for a hope of a rich life rather than a better one. Through Gatsby, he showed that a life of material prosperity and glamour can often mask the underlying emptiness and dissatisfaction. For example, Gatsby lived a life “full” of people, but the quote “In his blue gardens...champagne and the stars” shows that despite all the people Gatsby hung out with he had no one who he truly could confide in or trust, he never actually connected with anyone (Source A). Having no one to talk to and/or trust leaves one to feel lonely as if they are
Open Document