Shakespeare Hamlet Feminist Analysis

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During the Elizabethan Era, which covers up the late 16th century in England, the right of women was not a priority, considered to be only a trivial matter. Women had a very limited chance of proper education, much less a job, and only a few legal rights. Naturally, women had to rely on men for financial support and was oftentimes ignored in the society. This suppressed women against acting by her own will, as an independent individual. Shakespeare too views women as ignorable individuals whose fate is defined by men and who are incapable of acting independently. This is portrayed by the interactions between male and female characters and the role of women in the plays of Shakespeare. Although in some cases Shakespeare did depict independent and ambitious women in his plays, he is…show more content…
His hatred is shown clearly in the interactions between the two people. For example, Hamlet says as he watches his mother with Claudius, “Let me not think on’t; frailty, thy name is woman!” (I.ii 146) Instead of degrading Gertrude only, he makes a statement which implies that all women are flawed. Ophelia, who is another female character from Hamlet, is Hamlet’s lover. When Hamlet is feigning madness, he speaks in a very dismissive attitude toward Ophelia. "I have heard of your paintings too, well enough. God hath given you one face, and you make yourselves another." (III.i. 6) The dialogue clearly shows that Hamlet views women as vain and superficial beings. Although Laertes, Ophelia’s brother may not straight-out ignore women, he unconsciously treats them as an inferior being to men. When Ophelia has to part with Laertes, who is leaving for France, he says, “Fear it, Ophelia, fear it, my dear sister, and keep within the rear of your affection, out of the shot and danger of desire.” (I.iii
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