The Rulemaking Process

1043 Words5 Pages
Rulemaking is the most important function performed by agencies of the government. It is a necessary part of policymaking because it is not often that laws are explicit enough to be adequately implemented (Longest, 2010, p. 122). Rulemaking takes places in many federal agencies that govern different policy areas which are responsible for implementing a variety of parts of legislation (Natow, 2015). Congress and various presidents have developed a detailed set of requirements and procedures to guide the rulemaking process. Rulemaking is the establishment of formal rules or regulations that are necessary to fully implement the intent of public laws (Longest, 2010, p. 101). This is a power derived from policymaking authority of Congress and…show more content…
Interest groups that represent individuals and/or organizations that are affected by a proposed policy are actively interested and involved in all aspects of policymaking (Longest, 2010, p. 118). Depending on the subject matter, different interest groups may have more or less representation in the rulemaking process (Natow, 2015, p. 367). Even prior to the comment period, interest groups begin lobbying for or against a proposed policy. Policymakers are fully aware that they will face this lobbying when developing policies and have come to expect that interest groups will attempt to influence the decision making. These interest groups work hard to ensure that policies enacted reflect their preferences (Longest, 2010, p. 119-120). Legislators will seek out interest groups that support their views in order to gain more power during the…show more content…
Interest groups use a variety of tools and political venues to affect decision making and wield a significant source of power for federal agencies (Yackee, 2006). Interest groups participate in both controversial and lower profile rules, although many times, the controversial topics seem to receive the most attention, especially in the public eye (Natow, 2015). They are able to sway public opinion and raise awareness concerning policy issues faced by the agency. They also have the ability to secure a budget great than what individuals are capable of securing and can assist agencies when they do not agree with presidential or congressional directives. The ability to research a potential rule requires significant resources – time, money, information and expertise (Murphy, 2012). Having substantial resources provides a great advantage for interest groups. They can utilize media to express their opinion and sway policymakers. They have the ability to hire professional staff that can dedicate time and effort to the regulatory work involved with the rulemaking process. This allows them to seek professionals with great experience (Natow, 2015, p. 377). Often, interest group leaders will seek to meet with the agency that has proposed policy and will lobby Congress to put pressure on the agency (Natow, 2015, p.
Open Document