The Secret Path Analysis

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Residential schools are significant to the people of Canada; it was an awful occurrence that happened for over 150 years. Settler Canadians recognize the pain they caused and are trying to resolve the complication, one way Settler Canadians are working towards reconciliation is by participating in events such as orange shirt day and by participating in campaigns like the Moose Hide Campaign, where you are supporting your commitment to honour, respect and protection for the women and children in your life by wearing a little square of moose hide on your shirt. Another way that non-Aboriginal Canadians reconciliate is by listening to the stories of children who survived or didn’t survive their experience. Two stories of children and their stories during this time are, Sugar Falls and Secret Path, the reader gets a better understanding of what happened during these times, and how these people felt and why they felt it. The themes of these stories is not only the hard times and experiences they had, but the strength they gained through it.…show more content…
First, there is an image of Chanie Wenjack, where he is walking in the rain slumped, all alone, and unable to read the map, but still trying his best to get home in the cold. In this image, Lemire uses the empty match jar to illustrate the emptiness Chanie has. Not only is Chanie walking away from the last bit of warmth, the fire, the last match but he’s walking away slumped and shivering. This word is two things in Chanie’s story, indivisibility and invisible. Indivisible because no matter how rough his life is, he just keeps going, he keeps going till death. He’s received abuse, he’s been taking from his family, he leaves his friends and he just wants to go home. He IS indivisible. Invisible because in those times, it was better not to be seen. When he ran, he was invisible, no one ran after him and he was gone. They wouldn’t see him
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