Childhood Self Illusion

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Section I: Overview The Self Illusion by Bruce Hood is a book best fit for a Psychology 20 Textbook. In the science non-fiction, Hood reveals how the notion of “self” appears during our infancy and how the design of the developing brain allows us to become socially reliant on others. He describes how “self” is the outcome of our interactions and contacts with others, and it really only exists within our brain. The experience of a person is constructed from a mass of mechanisms and processes that we are unaware of, while “Me”, something that someone describes themselves as, is similarly created, though we are more concious of the events that shaped it. Everyone in today’s society has shown that conscious experience, and our identity is highly…show more content…
Most things that we think is significant to our lives has something to do with other people. That thought is rooted into us during our early development. We take a longer time to build our feelings about our values, and morals. This is why the childhood of human species are lengthy compared to other species. As noted in the excerpt on page 26 starting with “Windows of opportunity exist...”, we devote much of our energy and time into our children, passing on as much experience and information as possible. All children are born sociable, however, they advance their feelings of self during their childhood as they grow to become…show more content…
The first concern is that if there is no previous knowledge on the brain, it may be harder for people to fully understand and grasp the concept, and may have to read a few sections more times. However, this should not be a big problem, as this is meant for Psychology 20, so students should have a general grasp of the brain before hand, and if necessary, there is a small section in the beginning of the book explaining necessary parts of the brain. Furthermore, the book makes many references to scientists or other scientific literature that may be unfamiliar to many students. Even so, because these references are not essential to the information, and students will be able to understand without knowledge of these extra sources, this small flaw will not negatively impact the student’s capability to comprehend the information. All of these minor imperfections within the book will not affect the students’ learning overall. The main point of the book will be able to be portrayed and understood by all students. The non-fiction by Hood not only helps students to further their understanding of the brain, but also brings in abstract ideas that they may be able to consider when thinking about the
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