The Six Characteristics Of Oedipus Rex As A Tragedy

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Based on Aristotle’s Poetics Oedipus Rex is considered a tragedy. Aristotle’s Poetics illustrate the six parts that every tragedy must have according to Aristotle. The six parts include plot, character, spectacle, song, diction, and thought. While Oedipus Rex clearly incorporates all six of the parts, it relates closest to the Poetics in character, plot, and song. According to Aristotle, all six of his parts are necessary to make a strong tragedy. Not only must these six parts be incorporated, but they must be used efficiently and effectively. Aristotle claims that his parts are used to perfection in Oedipus Rex, making it a perfect tragedy. Since Oedipus Rex fulfills Aristotle’s six parts in the Poetics correctly, Oedipus Rex is considered a tragedy. Oedipus Rex is considered a tragedy because it follows Aristotle’s Poetics outline. One part of the Poetics that Oedipus Rex clearly relates to is plot. The plot of Oedipus Rex follows all the rules and parts that the Poetics state. The plot relates to Oedipus Rex and the Poetics on many occasions throughout the tragedy. An example of them relating is when in Oedipus Rex, Oedipus cries, “Oh my children, the new blood of Ancient Thebes, why are you here? Huddling at my altar, preying before me, your branches wounding wool.” (Oedipus. Lines 1-3). Oedipus states the opening lines of the poem that start the “Cause and effect chain” (Aristotle 1). Aristotle says that the opening lines of the play must contribute to the start of

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