The Social Revolution: The Beginning Of The Industrial Revolution

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Before the Industrial Revolution, people would often perform work in the area of their homes by using hand tools, and necessary machinery (History.com). Not a single being at the beginning of the Industrial revolution would have thought how life-changing the transformation from the old civil times to modern technology would be. The industrial revolution initially kicked off in Britain in the late 1700s. Britain's changes later inspired many other countries also to boost their economies and even start their own Industrial Revolution. Although the start of the revolution came with both superb and poor results, the Industrial Revolution is a significant event in world history because it sparked the beginning of mass production, newly advanced…show more content…
Many people lived in small rural areas and didn't do much more than growing crops, and farm. While there was little to no manufacturing was done in these small rural areas, many people had a difficult time living as they were often extremely malnourished and had to produce their clothing, food, and basic living necessities (History.com). In this time, Britain was superior over their surrounding neighbors and flipped a new page in their book. They had a significant accumulation of coal and iron ore, which provide the necessities for industrialization. Additionally, because Britain was in an exceptional place in their economy and was socially stable, they served to be one of the world's greatest leaders at the start of the Industrial Revolution. The production of new machinery was on the rise and inventors were throwing ideas left and right; making new machines to increase the quality and quantity of resources. Instead of individuals producing products individually, factories started to bloom around in cities and provided a place for a line of products to be created at faster pace. For example, Richard Arkwright, a genius who became very wealthy from building factories is the man with the brains. He created the growth of factories and nearly bought one of the highest changes Great Britain. He initially made a…show more content…
Unfortunately, this is one of the worst results of the industrial revolution, but also a good turning point in history. Company owners needed to find employees to work for them for cheap and with hard working skills. The factory owners did not provide safe environments for their workers and often overworked them to the point of utter exhaustion (History.com). "The overworking does not apply to children only; the adults are also overworked. The increased speed given to machinery within the last thirty years, has, in very many instances, doubled the labour of both" states the author John Fielden, in his book called "The Curse of the Factory System." After many people saw how the employees were being treated, some laws were put into place. One of the called "The Factory Act," put child labor laws into effect and set a specific set of rules for how workers should be treated while working. The Factory Act instructed that owners were to have four active higher authority persons in charge, and made sure that factory owners had to license to own a factory (Thenationalarchives.gov.uk). Once again, without this turning point in history, labor laws may not have been in effect
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