The Stamp Act Analysis

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Tonight, a warm summer night in 1765, I was sitting down with my family for dinner. News had spread around that there was a recent act passed by the motherland, called The Stamp Act. “I find this... odd, that 's all.” I spoke to my wife, Mary, looking to my dinner in front of me. “You know, this... “Stamp Act” being passed.” My family and I had just sat down for dinner, and I figured I would bring up the subject. “Honey... what do you think?” “I think it 's horrendous.” She spat. “By touching these new sheets of paper, it 's worse than death. It 's just slavery.” (Dickinson) “Papa... not to interrupt you and mother... but what exactly is the Stamp Act?” Asked my 15-year-old daughter, Sarah. “I 've heard rumors, but I haven 't the slightest clue of what it is.” I opened my…show more content…
“They 're probably thinking it 's “absurd” as well, and they 're probably in opposition to the Stamp Act, as well.” “That 's a good point, Papa, but what do you think they 're going to do about it?” asked Sarah. I laughed as I took a bite of a slice of bread. “Who knows what they 're going to do?” I said, between chews. “There might be riots, protests... petitions...” Sarah stood up. “I like that last idea. Petitioning the British Parliament. It is our right as British subjects in these colonies to petition the king, is it not?” (Stamp Act Congress) Sarah 's voice built up with confidence. “And if they refuse to consider our petition,” (Stamp Act Congress), “is that not taking our freedom, which is what we came to America for?” Mary smiled and sipped her tea. “There 's the girl I raised.” I took a spoonful of beans and looked to Sarah. “What you have to realize, Sarah,” I swallowed my beans. “Is that you have to have your reasons to petition. Think about it. What would you petition for?” Sarah took in a deep breath. “I would say that the cost for all of our imports would be more, which isn 't a good thing.” “Why? Why is that
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