The Struggle For Freedom In Thomas Paine's Common Sense

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Hostility with King George III of England was at an all-time high during 1776 in the American colonies. Americans were discouraged by the actions of their leaders across the pond. They were placed under trade and tax restrictions and lacked any privacy while English and mercenary soldiers occupied their homes. They had been battling what seemed to be an endless war. Like a child’s clothes during the shift into adulthood, as America developed, England’s restrictions tightened, and Americans started to discuss independence. The emphatic and most persuasive of these debates belonged to Thomas Paine and his pamphlet, Common Sense. His work highlighted the dispute for American freedom in a way no one had done previously and had a deep impact on the Declaration of…show more content…
He didn't want to be prisoned as a result of speaking out against British law; his obscurity was for the best, for it was the concepts in his work that quickly became popular and eventually turned Common Sense a bestseller in America during that time period. The pamphlet spread through the colonies with a distinct meaning: America needs to be liberated from Britain. Thomas Paine's work became popular for many reasons, but the most important being he used arguments, allusions and vernacular that the average person could understand. This pamphlet inspired many people to get involved in the struggle for freedom. It also prepared the Americans for the writing of the Declaration of Independence; one of the most important documents in human history. Thomas Paine’s amazing literary abilities unite the American people against the tyrannical England. The use of various themes in Common Sense exemplifies the contrast of the ethics of the New World, against the oppression of the Old World as the result of using his influential rhetoric; Ultimately producing one of the world’s most significant and successful works of
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