The Struggle Of Segregation In The 1950's

499 Words2 Pages
The 1950s were a very difficult time for the average African-American going so far that, they had segregation to the most basic things like toilets, drinking fountains, buses and schools. Despite the “Brown versus board” chapter history in 1954 which condemned segregation in schools on constitutional, only a very few handful of black African-Americans actually went to a school they had white people in it in the south of America.

African-Americans still like this and this was shown even before 1 December 1955 when wasn’t Parks who have already made history was arrested. This was shown by groups like ^^^^^.

Their struggle and for many of us, it is acturely our struggle became a lot easier on 1 December 1955 when Rosa was Parks was arrested, simply refusing to give up her seat but could someone else want to sit down and believed he was entitled to her seat simply because he was white and she was black. Rosa refused to give up her seat and asked the person asking her to move “$$$4$”.

Despite what many of us considered you Morley don’t do, Rosa was arrested, in case you’re a black African-American, you may feel better to know that this wasn’t Rose’s first time with his income of her seat but it was her first arrests for it.

A man who I have high respect for Called E.D Nixon who is/ was Montgomery community
…show more content…
This is one of the most historic meetings I been a part of and perhaps my first ever historical meeting. On # Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) was formed for the purpose of seeing who the Montgomery bus Boycott. I was surprised and proud to say I wasn’t expecting to become the leader I remember voicing my opinion claiming that, “well em… am not sure I am the best person for this position, since I am new to this community, and uh, but if no one else going to serve, someone has to do it, and I would be glad to do
Open Document