The Sugar Revolution

1797 Words8 Pages
From the very first traces of the chemical elements necessary for the creation of sugar, to the necessity of sugar for life, allowing the human race to survive and thrive, sugar was a profound discovery. Back when chemical elements were first created, select elements created a carbohydrate called sucrose, the basis of sugar. When life began appearing on Earth, plants that create sugar grew. When humans stopped moving around, they began to farm and harvest plants like sugar. And finally, humans took sugar and made it into something more and essentially something much better, and used it to interconnect societies during the modern revolution. Sugar has changed the Earth and ultimately it has kept humans alive, and provided energy for the human…show more content…
Abramson, Big History). Agriculture began 12,000 years ago, in Africa when foragers migrated to different continents. Migration lead to the human species remaining in one area and this was very important in the world of sugar because it allowed humans to settle, populate and most importantly, begin to farm and cultivate crops. In 510 B.C the Emperor Darius of what was then Persia invaded India where he found the first sign of sugarcane. From there his followers began to cultivate sugar and grow sugar to then produce a much more plentiful supply…show more content…
So soon after the growing and farming of sugar became an easy task for humans, people like John Pemberton, the creator of the sugar filled drink Coca Cola™, discovered ways to make sugar into much more of a developed food such as candy, which can be traced back almost as far as 2,000 BC to the era of Ancient Egypt (Candy History). In addition to food, sugar was also used as an ingredient within drinks. Sugar was also used as an essential ingredient for much more filling foods than candy such as sugar cookies, which can be traced back to the 1700s in Pennsylvania. The candy and sugar cookies and the sucrose it contains, were eventually used for religious purposes such as egyptian candy being used to worship their gods and goddesses, and sugar cookies being left out for Santa Claus for the Christian holiday of Christmas (Candy History). Sugar not only revolutionized eating and drinking, but also helped start and spark inspiration towards religious services and traditions. Another very famous use of sugar was in the 1700s when sugar first was used as a ingredient inside of desserts (Jonas Mikka Luster). Ever since the 1700s, which happens to be the very spark of the modern revolution, sugar has been transformed into the very famous meal that occurs at the very end of the day, named dessert. (Jonas Mikka Luster) In addition
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