The Tempest Setting Analysis

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The setting of a play is crucial to creating the mood and context for the drama, as well as the events that can follow. The setting of the Shakespearean play "The Tempest" takes place on a secluded island where Prospero and his daughter Miranda were exiled to many years ago by his brother Antonio. The isolation experienced on the island is used to shape let alone change the characters as well as the plot, most of the characters experience some form of growth by the end of the play. Weather it was: the Court Party realizing that sending Prospero and his daughter off into the sea to die serval years ago was wrong, Prospero putting the past behind him, forgiving those who had wronged him or the relationship between Ferdinand and Miranda. The…show more content…
In "The Tempest" Trinculo and Stephano arrive on the island with a bottle of sherry in hand, with a new friend Caliban at their side. The two men and Caliban wander the island as they drink, Caliban explains to the men the daily torture he faces from his master Prospero. He easily convinces the drunken men that the island could be theirs if they kill Prospero. The thought of being king of the island is intriguing to the men as they set out on a mission to find and kill Prospero. The societal rules that the men once followed no longer apply on the island, where they are led astray by Caliban who intent on exacting his revenge on Prospero. Soon Stephano is proclaimed to be lord of the island with Caliban as his "servant monster" (3.2.3). The setting of "The Tempest" allows for power-hungry characters to arise, furthermore we see this power struggle dynamic in other island novels like "Lord of the Flies". The 1954 novel written by William Golding showcases the power struggle between children once they are stranded on a deserted island. In the beginning, there are good intentions of setting up a form of government to keep the peace. However, some of the kids are led astray by Jack, who wants all the power within the group. As shown in both "The Tempest" and "Lord of The Flies" all rules that apply to civilization seem to be forgotten when the setting placed on an island. One character is always to blame for creating the power struggle which leads to death or the threat of death…show more content…
Shakespeare "The Tempest" is a Metadrama, which includes a tragedy, a romance and a comedy all in one. The Romance part of the metadrama is between the two characters Ferdinand and Miranda. After making it ashore Ferdinand is being drawn to Prospero and Miranda 's cave by Ariel 's song. Ferdinand is the first man that Miranda has ever laid eyes on, and she is instantly taken with him. Ferdinand had just lost his father, realizes that he is the Heir to his father 's throne moreover he will now have to assume his father 's responsibility as king. As these thoughts are going through Ferdinand 's head he sees Miranda and is instantly in love " And your affection, not gone forth, I 'll make you / The Queen of Naples" (1,2,449). Many readers may find Ferdinand 's gesture of love to be insincere, however having lived in isolation on the island, Miranda knows no different, she has never been taught the proper etiquette that a woman of her age would adhere to when courting a suitor. It is to be expected that Miranda is honest with Ferdinand about her feelings towards him, she does not beat around the bush "I am your wife if you will marry me" (3.1.83). Miranda 's character is very innocent in comparison to her partner Ferdinand, who brags about all of the women he has been with. This difference in character obviously has to do with how and where each character was raised. Once Ferdinand has proved himself to Prospero, and he has been given Prospero 's blessing to marry his daughter.
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