The Theme Of Guilt In Patrick Shanley's Doubt: A Parable

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Guilt can only eat at someone for so long. Through Patrick Shanley’s play, Doubt: A Parable, a school called St. Nicholas faces some questionable actions, and Sister Aloysius, the principal, attempts to set them right. The Father at the school, Father Flynn, is accused of getting the only black student, Donald Muller, drunk and then molesting him. I conclude that Father Flynn is guilty because of his “clean nails” and resignation. To start, the first reason Father Flynn is guilty is because of his “clean nails”. Metaphorically speaking, someone who is clean is innocent. No dirt can be found if they keep themselves cleansed: “See look at my nails . . . look at how clean they are. That makes it okay” (Shanley 16). He is explaining to male students how they should always keep their nails clean and nothing else will matter. As Father Flynn continues to talk to the boys about the poor condition of their nails, he…show more content…
From a different view, it is potential that Sister Aloysius attacks Father and he is just wanting to go to another perish because of the friction at St. Nicholas. Sister Aloysius holds a meeting with Mrs. Muller, the boys mother: “It wont end with your son, there will be more if there aren’t already . . . I’m trying to throw him out” (Shanley 49). Donald’s mother is not very worried about the situation that occurred. She wants the best for her soon and St. Nicholas is a good school, with the exception of Father Flynn. Donald has a hard home life and his mother thinks it best for him to just suck it up and finish the school year. This position is wrong because Mrs. Muller wants the best for Donald and thinks the education from a good school is worth being molested: “ It’s just till June. Something aren’t black and white” (Shanley 49). Some circumstances it is easier to sweep the problem under the rug until dealing with it is an absolute must. Unfortunately, that’s the case for

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