The Theme Of Revenge In Hamlet

885 Words4 Pages
major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. Ben Jonson calls ‘Shakespeare not of an age, but for all time’. In the 20th and 21st centuries, his works have been repeatedly adapted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular and are constantly studied, performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world. Here I am going to express my views on the theme of revenge in the play ‘Hamlet’. The play was written between 1599 and 1602 during Elizabethan era. During the Elizabethan era, the revenge plays were well acclaimed. The dramatist picturised the theme of revenge in the play ‘Hamlet’ beautifully. Revenge causes the characters in play ‘Hamlet’ to act blindly through anger and emotion, rather than through reason. Fortinbras, Laertes and Hamlet were all looking to avenge the deaths of their fathers. They all acted on emotion driven by the want for revenge for their father 's deaths, and this led to the downfall of two,…show more content…
Laertes found out about his father 's death, and immediately returned home. He confronted the King and accused him of the murder of his father. Claudius told Laertes that Hamlet was responsible for his father 's death. He then decides to kill Hamlet to avenge the death of his father. He and Claudius enact a plot to kill Hamlet. Hamlet dies of wounds from the poisoned tipped sword Laertes used. ". Hamlet was deeply sorrowed by his father 's death. He spoke to a ghost, and this ghost stated that his father 's death was a murder, by the hand of his uncle, Claudius. "The serpent that did sting thy father 's life now wears his crown." Hamlet was astonished, and then swore vengeance for his father 's death. He then proceeded to try and prove his uncle 's guilt, and then finally kills him while he himself is dying of poisoned wounds inflicted by Laertes during their duel. This left the King dead, and his father 's
Open Document