Prejudice And Racism In Richard Wright's Native Son

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The whole world knows that African-American society has faced many crises over the past few decades, including the slave trade, racial discrimination, injustice, and hunger. In fact, all these events led to the loss of black identity. Here in the novel "Native Son" will try to highlight the main character "Bigger" in the novel and how the environment affected him. Bigger is considered a tragic figure, as he represents the African American experience of oppression in America. Richard demonstrates that many of the quickly changing and unpredictable conditions of the modern world have created people like Bigger, exploring for a place for themselves in a world that, for them, has wasted many of its cultural and spiritual centers. One of the main…show more content…
This demonstrates the positive display of characters such as Mary Dalton, Jan, Max, but it also has values for the display of family. In Marxist dogma, the family unit is unrelated to the matter of social change which can only come about by the common efforts of the proletariat in American circumstances, both black and white members of the working class working together to defeat the capitalist system. So, the Bigger family has undergone the influence of racism and oppression of slavery. Richard Wright was influenced by the literary school of naturalism, whose followers attempted to inspect and record their world, and particularly its more odious parts, with scientific accuracy. Wright knew bleakness-era Chicago well and drew with difficulty on his firsthand is knowing. In regards, the Chicago on Native Son an accurate portrayal even in its…show more content…
Many of Native Son's once upon a time scenes supported Wright's intentions in revealing how America's white racism influences Bigger's behavior, his thought, and his feelings. In addition to his reaction that led him to commit the crime. His sense of restraint in this world is visible. The unfocused, yet detailed, fear that the white world has changed Biggers actions takes over when he is in Mary's room and in danger of being identified by Mrs. Dalton. This internalized social oppression literally drive his hand when he holds the pillow over Mary's face, stuffy the drunken Mary. Bigger knew that no white person would believe he was not striving to rape Mary. As Bigger tells Max, "They believe that. ...when folks say things like that about you, you whipped before you born." (Bloom, 2009, pg.41) Bigger's sense of lifelong hopelessness becomes evident when he says, "I don't have to do nothing for 'em to get me. The first white finger they point at me, I'm a goner, see?" (Wright, 2016. pg. 381). That is why Bigger said he used violence. The violence is Bigger's only outlet of expression, the only manner he can revolt against the society that tries to crush him at each
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