Symbolism In Rudyard Kipling's Kim

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Britain was the greatest state all over the world. The majority of English novels address us how imperialist Britain was to occupy and settle in the occupied countries. Its occupation was as a result of a great deal of subjugations. It was an oppressive country, and the official authorities thenceforth practiced espionage activities on fields. They were proud and flamboyant of their imperialism and they achieved and accomplished their imperialist missions in many parts of the world by assistance of their devoted spy agents as the young intelligence officer Kim. This novel is the best novel about British India, and one of the most breathtaking stories of espionage, Rudyard Kipling's Kim published in 1901. Kim became the symbol of…show more content…
Yet he clearly loves India and its diversity of peoples and respects their cultural differences. He is mentally furnished that British race is the best ever. But he sees through a romantic lens. Still that lens is a wonderful way to view the world, especially given Kipling's poetic skills in writing. Kim is set in an imperialistic world; a world strikingly masculine, dominated by travel, trade and adventure, a world in which there is no question of the division between white and non-white. Two men, a boy who grows into early manhood and an old ascetic priest, the lama are at the center of the novel. A quest faces them both. Born in India, Kim is nevertheless white, a sahib. While he wants to play the Great Game of Imperialism, he is also spiritually bound to the lama. His aim, as he moves chameleon like through the two cultures, is to reconcile these opposing strands, while the lama searches for redemption from the Wheel of…show more content…
Mahbub Ali reassures Kim that his delivery of a key message ensured: "The game is well played. That war is done now and the evil we hope nipped before the flower, thanks to me and thee." The literature on Kim is voluminous and well-trodden.9 Critics of colonial discourse point to a range of moral flaws in Kipling's work. Edward Said, who in 2000 wrote an introduction to a reprinted edition, felt that orientalist values permeated the novel to the extent that it was "a masterwork of imperialism."11 Agents collected information on the Russians and had no powers to make treaties. Their special duty was carried out quite openly for the rulers they visited. British officers, meanwhile, never entered Russian territory without permission. Morgan even questioned the success of the actual intelligence officers, doubting if there was anything that they really achieved, beyond gathering tidbits of geographical
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