The Third Dumpster Character Analysis

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People have a way of censoring themselves. Erasing the existence of having a choice in testing times, and thus engage in something, they are against, in an ethical perspective. That has always been a factor in some people that commits crime. They willfully place themselves in a box, turning a blind eye to their responsibility as a citizen, and they might even complain, or remind the others of the severity of their actions, but at the end of the day, they are a part of the crime. They are unable to recognize that there is always a choice, and that they are ignoring it, maybe because they are not as righteous as they would like, or simply because it is easier to follow the flow. This kind of character is popular in pop culture, and even have…show more content…
He is unemployed, divorced, and compliant. Although, he is constantly disapproving of Morehouse’s carelessness toward their criminalities, he does not prevent him, but participate in everything. The rare occasion where he voices his thoughts, Goodwin beats himself up over being lesser than Morehouse. The novel is written in third person with a subjective narration, and even through the style of the writing, the reader can detect Goodwin’s submission. There are no quotation marks around any of the direct dialogues, and that could represent how so much are left unsaid, between Goodwin and his family. He knows them inside out. Morehouse does not respect his opinions and his parents are disapproving. He often prevents himself from voicing his view, because their responses are as predictable, as the sky is…show more content…
He does not have an independent bone in his body, and continuously reduces his instincts in favor for his brother’s orders, and endures his parents’ slander. Perhaps, because he always succeeds, when he is a team. In a way, he also looks up to his brother, who is careless, a husband and confidently brash. However, it also contributes to his perception of himself, as an inferior. There is great pride in what he has accomplished with Morehouse, and maybe that is why he goes to great lengths – as far as throwing the garbage into the third dumpster – because it brings meaning to his life, and the feeling of victory. The interesting thing about the dumpsters is that he personifies them. He is actually heartened by the dumpster in front of him, who represent the platonic ideal of a dumpster. It may have touched him deeply, because in a symbolic essence his expectations of himself is that dumpster. He does not imagine something unattainable for himself, but just to reach the accessible average
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