The Two Best Grievances Of The Declaration Of Independence

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The Declaration of Independence was adopted at the second continental congress which allowed for the thirteen colonies to come to an agreement that they desired to be free from Great Britain's ruling. This document has and will always be extremely important to the United States because it turned the thirteen colonies into thirteen independent sovereign states. This document contains a list of grievances and gives an effective philosophical basis for that justified the desire for independence. The Declaration of Independence played an essential role in the formation of the new colonial government by providing a philosophical basis upon which the free colonists’ could hold. The philosophy behind the document is that all free citizens of the United …show more content…

Jefferson is referring to the Quartering Acts that the king imposed upon the colonists. This is a grievance because the Quartering Acts were a direct offense on the colonist’s natural rights. The colonists were forced to house the soldiers without their consent which is Britan controlling them. This also angered colonists because they were forced into providing resources for soldiers who they did not consent to house. Which, like the other grievance, reveals that the King can still do whatever he wants with the colonists which violates the idea of individual rights. The reason that this is one of the best grievances is because it reveals that even though the colonists have their own governments they still are heavily under British ruling. This grievance makes it obvious that their individual rights are being …show more content…

The first grievance is "for depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury”. This is a bad grievance because it affected a smaller portion of the population, which leads to a weaker argument. This points out that the British had the final say of who was and was not sentenced to jail. This had Britain in control because there was not anyone else to prevent these rulings or to have a different thinking towards it. This only affects the law breakers which represent a smaller portion of the country. The counterargument would be that if a colonist did not like how legal decisions then they should not be getting into trouble with the

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