The Utilization Of John Proctor In The Crucible By Arthur Miller

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John Proctor is an excellent example of Arthur Miller's utilization of the varying degrees of goodness and evil to propel the story of The Crucible forward. John Proctor is a successful and well-respected farmer who holds himself at a particular distance from the Church, a rarity at the time. This may be related to the guilt he has come to know, as he has sinned, and openly condemns the trials taking place while hiding the secrets of his affair with the accuser, Abigail Williams. Proctor, an outspoken man entirely consumed by his guilt, must take responsibility for his actions, publicly confess his sins, denounce Abigail Williams, and save his soul from eternal damnation. John Proctor has held resentment towards Revered Parris since his appointment …show more content…

John uses his wife Elizabeth's illness as an excuse to avoid Sunday services, a decision that comes back to haunt the Proctors. When Salem becomes abuzz with talk of witches, John questions Parris' intentions in the company of some of Salem's most prominent and influential citizens. He learns that Parris has sent for the Reverend John Hale, an expert on witches and witchery, without first calling a town meeting. A firm believer that Salem's decisions should be influenced by its citizens, John uses this situation to inform the others that he believes the talk of witchcraft is absurd and that the minister has overstepped his boundaries. The conflict leads to a dialogue regarding the reverend's demands for money and housing, a conversation that Proctor resumes with Reverend Hale when he pays a visit to the Proctor home later on. Guided by his inclination to punish those who oppose him, Reverend Parris directs Reverend Hale to the Proctor home. In his search for worshippers of the devil, Hale questions the Proctors about their absences from Sunday church services. John responds quickly to the inquiry, stating, "Since we built the church there were pewter candlesticks upon the altar; … …show more content…

That regard flourishes into loving devotion when Elizabeth is unjustifiably charged as a witch. He promises to her, "I will bring you home. I will bring you home soon" (73), as she leaves. When Proctor discovers that it is Abigail who has unjustly accused his wife, he suddenly comprehends that he has kept his illicit affair a secret for too long. John's self-serving desire to remain highly regarded in the community has weakened him in comparison to Abigail, who now is in control. His love for his wife compels Proctor to convince his young housekeeper Mary Warren to go to the court and recount everything she knows about the lies that Abigail Williams and the other accusers are telling. In order to get what he wants, John threatens Mary by screaming " … I will bring your guts into your mouth but goodness will not die for me" (80). In court, Mary Warren surrenders to Abigail's threatening glares and refuses to testify. John Proctor is arrested as a devil worshipper for attempting to undermine the witch trials and it is wrongly determined that Proctor lied when admitting to an affair with Abigail in order to discredit her ludicrous claims. Still floundering to atone for his sins, John uses his last opportunity to speak to Elizabeth before he is hung to profess his love to her. "You are a marvel, Elizabeth"

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