The Victorian Servants In The Victorian Era

745 Words3 Pages
The life of a victorian servant was extremely hard. But, a lot of them considered themselves to be lucky because they had food to eat and a roof over their heads regardless of how much they got paid. They were all very desperate and in need of money but this went a pretty long way in sustaining them. Additionally, many began service at very young ages and were conditioned to accept this as the natural order of things.
Servants were put into the lowest positions in large houses at very young ages, even kids as low as 8-10 years old. When they are serving in a larger home, servants might then have to be put into smaller houses with fewer servants, which are often 30-50 miles from their home. They preferred that distance because they thought that the servants would be less likely to spread gossip about their family life. Servants were often recruited from rural backgrounds as they were seen as more convenient.
The Victorian Era was described as a man's world. To be more specific, it was a wealthy, higher-class, man’s world, and it was even better if the men had land, a big home, a title, and a devoted wife. Women of the upper-class delighted in a life full of traveling, fancy clothes, superior food and of course, servants, and staff to do chores for them.
Although the upper-class life seemed pretty settled, they
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Governesses were pretty rare in the modern era but actually very common in the Victorian times. They educated them with grammar lessons, reading, and writing. Music lessons were also taught by governesses of the Victorian times. The Victorian governesses were a little bit different from today's governesses. The Victorian governesses did not teach the children with advanced education. Which is done today by modern governesses. Women that worked as governesses belonged to the middle-class region of society. Many women that weren’t married became governesses to help support themselves
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