The Visualization Of Imagery In Katherine Mansfield's Miss Brill

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This short story is quite diverse from Katherine Mansfield’s other stories, for starters there's a deeper and more elaborate visualization of scenery, rather than character analysis. Peculiarly it was written in third person, yet it sounds as if the reader can hear Miss Brill through the pages and example for such accusation follows, “There were a number of people out this afternoon, far more than last Sunday. And the band sounded louder and gayer.” These sentences were conducted in the third person, yet Mansfield manages to position the reader inside Miss Brill’s mind almost as if they are reading from it. To evoke voice, the imagery throughout this story is very explicit and perceived. The entire story circumferences around Miss Brill’s imagination and at times we get…show more content…
Due to the fact she is a teacher, during the week, it is probably the reason Mansfield chose to name her Miss- female and unmarried teacher- to emphasize her loneliness and job description. It’s ironic to believe Miss Brill is so lonely, being that her job revolves around childcare, so she’s constantly in contact with other people during the week, yet this symbol of loneliness arises multiple times. Furthermore, her first name is never presented throughout the story, inferring she never encounters a moment in which it would be necessary- emphasizing she is friendless. She also uses symbolism to further analyze Miss Brill’s fur coat. She states in the beginning of the story her coat is old and rather worn, “She had taken it out of its box that afternoon, shaken out the moth powder, given it a good brush, and rubbed life back into the dim little eyes.” This symbolizes Miss Brill herself, allowing the reader some characteristics about who she is and what she looks like, hence she is an older woman who has seen better days. Furthermore, the scenery around Miss Brill is thoroughly described and emphasized throughout the

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