The Wash Woman Analysis

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“Blessed is the one who perseveres under trial because, when he has stood the test, he will receive the crown of life that God has promised to those who love him,” states James 1:12. Hardships mature people into who they were created to be. “Gwilan’s Harp” by Ursula K. LeGuin, “The Washwoman” by Isaac Singer, and “The Last Leaf” by O. Henry demonstrate how troubles . Throughout these narratives, life-altering loss occurs, but even as hope fades, Gwilan, the washwoman and Johnsy rebuild their perspectives on life and rekindle contentment.
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The loss in Gwilan’s life nearly stifles her hope. First, in a wagon accident, her beloved harp shatters and her wrist breaks. As a result, her livelihood as a musician ends. Later in her life even after she receives new harps, she cannot play since her hands
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The wash woman works diligently, but not tirelessly. “She had been driven by an indomitable will to return the property to its rightful owners, to fulfill the task she had undertaken.” (Singer) She never loses her dignity, but instead dies at a good old age tired and worn out, ready for heaven. 2 more sentences!

Johnsy tires of life in her sick bed. Throughout the length of the story, she battles Pneumonia and depression. As Sue, her friend, tries to help her recover. Out of compassion, old Behrman, their neighbor, paints a leaf on the tree and dies after the exertion.
Johnsy says, “Something has made that last leaf stay there to show me how wicked I was.” (O’Henry) 2 more sentences!
Conclusion
They all experience loss and mental anguish, but pull through and become stronger people because of the hardships. Throughout these narratives, life-altering loss occurs, but even as hope fades, Gwilan, the washwoman and Johnsy rebuild their perspectives on life and rekindle
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