The Yellow Wallpaper Jekyll And Hyde Analysis

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The success of “The Yellow Wallpaper” and Jekyll and Hyde is due to its psychological effects brought upon their main characters, due to their doppelganger. The Yellow Wallpaper and Jekyll and Hyde are two different short stories that were both written during the 19th century, which both have a similar style in which they convey a message relating to the norms during that era. The comparison between the main characters and their doppelgangers are raised by creating conflict between the two characters. The woman in the wallpaper from The Yellow Wallpaper and Hyde from Jekyll and Hyde have a psychological effect on the main characters particularly by creating havoc and aid, but affecting them in a different way. Charlotte Perkins…show more content…
Indicated by her saying: “It is getting to be a great effort for me to think straight” (Gilam 652). She starts to see a woman in the patterns of the yellow wallpaper moving, as the reader you can tell that she isn 't actually seeing things in the wallpaper. While in the nursery she has a thought: “At night in any kind of light, in twilight, candlelight, lamplight, and worst of all by moonlight, it becomes bars! The outside pattern I mean, and the woman behind it is as plain as can be.” (Gilman 653). In other words, Jane imagines the yellow wallpaper as a cage. Her confinement is stressing her and we can see that it is taking a toll on her. She describes the yellow wallpaper as if it was becoming a cage, in which she was trapped in with the girl who in a way is her. Gilman uses imagery by using many descriptive words to enhance the reader 's perception of the setting, making them understand the setting or plot better. The womimagean in the wallpaper is representing the situation that Jane is in, trapped. In Jekyll and Hyde Louise Stevenson creates havoc for Dr. Jekyll, by showing us that Hyde is slowly taking over Dr. Jekyll. Dr. Jekyll originally created Hyde for his own enjoyment, a body in which he could “let go” his inner tensions and anger. Hyde however becomes too powerful for Dr. Jekyll to contain: “‘You are very good,’ sighed the other. ‘I should like to very much; but no, no, no, it is quite impossible; I dare not. But indeed,…show more content…
Hyde. Stevenson uses a passive voice when describing Jekyll 's state, as it is genuine sounding, rather than if Jekyll had been saying this. Utterson proceeds to tell him something about Hyde Jekyll strictly replies: “I do not care to hear more,’ said he. ‘This is a matter I thought we had agreed to drop.” (Gilman 24). We can infer that Jekyll does not want anyone to find out about Hyde, as it brings him happiness. These two scenarios compare by the authors both giving the main characters aid from their doppelgangers, affecting them in a positive way temporarily. Contrasting the effects their doppelgangers towards the end and the beginning, we can say that chaos will occur at
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