Their Eyes Were Watching God And Hurston's Treatment Of Women

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A strong-willed woman refuses to be manipulated no matter the role she plays. In the novel, “Their Eyes Were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston and the short story, “Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway, there is a common theme of independence blooming from judgment. While Hurston focuses on true development, including puberty and relationships, Hemingway highlights reproductive rights and the role of women during this time. Hurston portrays Janie as a minority, illustrating her with flawless mixed skin and beautiful long hair that symbolizes her freedom throughout the novel. Mrs. Turner says Janie is “a heaven of straight haired, thin-lipped, high-nose-bone white seraphs…[and] she paid homage to Janie’s Caucasian characteristics …show more content…

So this was a marriage!” (Hurston 10). Hurston describes the ‘ecstatic shiver’ and ‘sanctum of a bloom’ to exhibit Janie’s development and her increasing independence as she becomes a woman. Janie sees the beauty in development as nature speaks it into her. She is unique in her perspective and that too sets her apart. Hemingway, on the other hand, does not describe the Girl physically, but …show more content…

The man she is with keeps pushing her to make a life-changing decision about an abortion and she says, “I realize… Can’t we maybe stop talking?,” (Hemingway 3). Including this issue specifically is bold for Hemingway as it is controversial, yet he crafts it to bring even more attention to the Girl’s rights and intentionally characterizes her with this strong will and independence. She later threatens to scream, demonstrating that the Girl is unafraid to bring attention to this altercation. Hemingway provides the Girl with a voice that many women did not have. The man craves authority and manipulates her by saying, “I think [getting the abortion is] the best thing to do. But I don’t want you to do it if you don’t really want to,” (Hemingway 3). The Girl, however, dismisses him and keeps her independent opinion no matter what judgment may spring from the man. The short story ends with the girl saying,, “There’s nothing wrong with me. I feel fine,” (Hemingway 4). She asserts her confidence and the way she feels, not conforming to the man’s beliefs. This is similar to Janie,

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