Theme Of Feminism In Antigone

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Antigone through an Anarchist and a Feminist lens by Mansour AlSubaie

Antigone the Ancient Greek tragedy by Sophocles can be interpreted through several types of critical lenses. It can be best analyzed by an Anarchist and a Feminist lens for the following reason; the act of Antigone’s standing against Creon. In addition, to the act of Polynices going against Eteocles. These parts of the story are inspired by several cultural background tradition. Including the treatment of women which was a great issue in Ancient Greece for many years. Furthermore, creating a rebellious, strong and independent female character is considered revolutionary at the time of the play. So despite that these terms were not invented at the time of the play, it definitely
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Feminism plays a major role in hundreds of cultures, as it raises attention to civil liberties of women across the globe. Applying this to Antigone, it was certainly against the norm of a typical ancient Greek woman to rebel against a male authority. This is reason to believe that Antigone may have shown signs of early feminism. Women in ancient Greece were generally fearful that rebellion against male authority would lead to unfortunate circumstances. The fact that Antigone went against the orders of Creon shows definite female power. Antigone followed her beliefs strongly, and ignored the threats of higher powers telling her to do otherwise. Antigone took responsibility for her actions, and did not try to hide the fact that she was rebelling. Finally, the fact that Antigone commits her own death at the end, shows her unwillingness to accept male…show more content…
During Sophocles’ lifetime there was a patriarchal society bordering on Androcrac. Also Ancient Greece’s government systems were absolute monarchies Nonetheless, women were still regarded as objects, even by those people considered 'liberals' and 'republicans'. Women were treated as second-class citizens as they were not allowed to own land unless nobility, viewed as inferior to men in basically every
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