Theme Of Greed In Lord Of The Flies

999 Words4 Pages
For some extra money, Milo makes deals with the Germans, he agrees to bomb his own friends without a second thought, killing several in the action., while saving the runway and hanger so his pilots could get a quick meal. By this decision, it is clear to show how greed is so great in Milo that he decides to bomb his own. In this case, greed leads to poetic justice. This time Milo had gone too far. Bombing his own men and planes was more than even the most phlegmatic observer could stomach, and it looked like the end for him. … Milo was all washed up until he opened his books to the public and disclosed the tremendous profit he had made. (Joseph Heller, 243 ) This quote outlines Milo's greed as he went so far as to endanger his squad mates'…show more content…
Military officer Colonel Cathcart exhibits greed through his extreme ambition to become General, and the power that comes with it. He continually raises the required missions for a tour of duty throughout the novel. By demonstrating no care about the soldiers, Col. Cathcart sacrifices all integrity in the name of greed for power. Peckem already is a general, but he is the director of Special Services, he yearns to control military operations. After all, he concludes, what could be more "special" than bombing the hell out of people? Greed leads both Peckem and Cathcart into debilitating corruption. Peckem finally gets his appointment to military operations and Cathcart is responsible for the deaths of men…show more content…
According to Freudian psychoanalysis “repression of the instinctual id leads to the psychopathology of everyday life, which in turn makes violent behavior commonplace.” ( Jennifer McClinton-Temple1, 18). Likewise, Herbert Marcuse in his book Eros and Civilization (1955) attempted to fuse Freudian and Marxist theories to undercut the cultural codes that over determine and repress human psychology and sexuality, resulting in deviant tendencies. The complexity of human violence has been studied in modern Psychiatry. James Gilligan in his 1996 book, Violence: Reflections on a National Epidemic, offers a theory on the origin of violent behavior. According to Gilligan “ much of what appears to be anomalous or inexplicable regarding violent behavior is actually predictable and understandable given a certain set of conditions.” ( Dereck Daschke,
Open Document