Theme Of Metaphors In To Kill A Mockingbird

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The author of To Kill A Mockingbird Harper Lee had wrote Atticus to say “...it is a sin to kill a mockingbird.” (Lee 103). He said this to Scout and Jem because mockingbirds give nothing but music for the world to enjoy and it would be cruel and uncalled for to take their life. The reason Lee wrote this is because the story has a few metaphorical mockingbirds. In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird, Atticus Finch, Tom Robinson and Boo Radley are all metaphorically portrayed as mockingbirds because of their good deeds and pure hearts, such as the birds. Mr. Atticus Finch has been proven multiple times in the story that he is a good hearted gentleman that only wishes to do the right thing. One instance is just the simple fact that he defended Tom Robinson to his best ability when the whole caucasian community in Maycomb County wanted him locked up for his alleged raping of Mayella Ewell. "You aren 't really a nigger-lover, then, are you?" "I certainly am. I do my best to love everybody... I 'm hard put, sometimes—baby, it 's never an insult to be called what somebody thinks is a bad name. It just shows you how poor that person is, it doesn 't hurt you." (124) In this, Atticus explains to Scout that he is defending Tom because he wants to and he is not ashamed of it or what anybody thinks. When no one would stand in Tom’s corner, Atticus was more than willing since it was the right thing to do. Tom Robinson is the second mockingbird in this book. His innocence in trying
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