Analysis Of A Doll's House By Henrik Ibsen

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Struggles in life often motivate people to do the best that they can in whatever they do so a better future can be achieved. In the 1870’s, however, it was very difficult for women to better their lives because of the oppression of men and society in general. Women basically had absolutely no rights and lived at the mercy of their husbands. This is very obvious in the play A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen. In this play Nora wars against many problems she has in her life. The many types of conflicts Nora goes through in the play are what drive the plot.
The first type of conflict Nora endures in A Doll House is that with her fellow man. For example, she has to hide the smallest things from her husband going as far as lying about where she got the
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To explain, while nora is fighting with Torvald about leaving him although she has no care, all he can think about is “what people will say”(1713). Nora cares for her children and knows she will be criticized for leaving her family. She has to look deep inside of herself for a life changing decision for her sanity, but her fight inside of herself to leave leads her so find some independence in her thinking. Nora’s conflicting thoughts of how she should treat her children also advance her decisions. While Torvald is going on about how “almost everyone who goes bad early in life has a mother who is a chronic liar” she begins to worry about her own children(1685). Nora’s decision to leave her family is influenced by her knowledge that her crooked good intentions may result in her children turning out to be rotten people just because of how her husband thinks. In conclusion, Nora brings herself to leave her normal life through her thoughts and decisions she has to make.
Obviously Nora is driven through her problems to find a better life and to get out of the troubling doll house she is living in. Although extremely uncommon the time A Doll House was set in, she is one of the few people whose eyes were opened to the unfairness in her life, and she finds an unlikely way out instead of settling for complacency. Luckily in modern times women can do almost whatever they want and are considered equals to

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