Themes And Allusions In Keith Eisner's 'Blue Dot'

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Keith Eisner’s “Blue Dot”, a short story about four people sharing an experience under the influence of drugs. The main characters name is never revealed but suggests it may be Eisner since the story is written in first person. One summer day in the city of Detroit, a couple ingest LSD and smoke marijuana with a roommate, while having a conversation with a weekend missionary. While under the influence of drugs, they shared a spiritual moment that changed their personal lives and spiritual beliefs. Eisner used several allusions throughout the story for a theme of spirituality involving the character’s experiences and conflict in the narrator’s own belief. The first allusion was presented by Denny, who’s spiritual journey led him to a revelation of doubt and suffering. Denny’s mantra, “Enoch walked with God; and he was no more, for God took him”. (142) Eisner wanted the reader to…show more content…
Faith shares her spiritual experience that pertains to Mrs. Trent while working in her aunt’s hair salon. A few months after Mrs. Trent’s death, Faith receives a card addressed from Mrs. Trent. The inscription is the verse from Song of Songs 8:6, “Place me like a seal over your hart, like a seal on your arm for love is as strong as death…” (151). Eisner expresses to the reader the note written by Mrs. Trent was to her daughter Faith just before she disappeared. According to one scholar Song of Songs 8:6, “some read this as a wish for nearness: If only I were her little seal-ring / the keeper of her finger! / I would see her love each and every day..., A second alternative is to understand the seal as one that marks ownership, such as the engraved seals made of semi-precious stone used to stamp on the wet clay of a jar” (Dharamraj 4). All indications point to Mrs. Trent was Faiths mother, yet Faith did not acknowledge or ever mention her again. Eisner’s subtle message that even though a we may not know God, He always knew

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