Themes In Night By Elie Wiesel

1132 Words5 Pages
The memoir, Night, by Elie Wiesel is written about the author’s traumatic experiences during the Holocaust, using a variety of elements such as imagery, tone, and point of view to develop the story he has to tell. Through the use of plotline, he provides an insight of the events during the Holocaust through his own perspective to emotionally and ethically appeal to the reader and prevent such events from happening again. Although the memoir includes numerous significant events during the Holocaust, the structure of his plotline is set to represent and emphasize important moments he had witnessed. Nonetheless, incidents such as the climax of the death of his father, often evoke depressing and traumatizing emotions from the readers to urge the…show more content…
Throughout the memoir, Wiesel describes many events that were significant to him, from his life before Auschwitz, to his own liberation. From his arrival, Elie stayed close to his father with the goal to “not to lose him. Not to remain alone,” (Wiesel 30). However, towards the end, Wiesel reveals that he loses his father to Death, setting this particular event as the climax of the story. Through the perspective of Elie as a teenager, losing his father was the most important memory, even if it was not historically significant. Ever since he was separated from his mother and sisters, His father was the only person he had left. Because of this, Elie did everything to keep his father alive as long as possible, such as giving up his ration of food, but the death of his father had made him realize that “you cannot think of others. Not even your father. In this place, there is no such thing as father, brother, friend,” (Wiesel 110). Although deaths occur frequently throughout the camp, each person must fight and work for their own survival. However, his father’s death also represents the suffering of other prisoners and how the living cannot grieve for the dead. Even so, the climax of the memoir also affects the reader’s emotion in a negative…show more content…
Although death became norm within the camp, those that are the most significant to Elie are the deaths of those he knows. Because of this, the death of his father had become notably more devastating for him than the numbness he feels for the deaths of the other prisoners within the camp. The suffering and passing of the only family member he had left impacted him greatly then, causing Wiesel to describe the situation in vivid details in his memoir. The sacrifices he was willing to make for his father affects the readers gravely; from the helplessness Elie feels when his father was dying to how he had to suppress his sorrow for the sake of his own survival. A foreboding tone was set while his father weakened, before it turned into a somber and dark tone for his death. Through Elie’s experience in the camp, he developed immunity to deaths, even towards the death of his own father. The readers would feel sympathy along with sorrow, towards his situation in a way that makes them rethink their thoughts or opinions about the Holocaust and similar events. The death of Elie’s father is only one in millions of lives that were taken away during the
Open Document