Brief Summary Of The Cyclops In Homer's Odyssey

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Summary: Cyclops In the story, Odysseus is still speaking to the Phaeacians, but is now telling them of his encounter with Polyphemus, the cyclops. Strong winds blew Odysseus and his men to Polyphemus’ island, where they unloaded and entered a cave that Polyphemus happened to live in. When he entered the cave, he closed the entrance with a large boulder that only he could move, trapping himself, his sheep, and Odysseus inside. After he ate some of Odysseus’ men, Odysseus devised a plan to get the cyclops to move the boulder so that the men could escape. He gave Polyphemus liquor, making him drunk, and shoved a massive makeshift spear into his the cyclops’ only eye. Polyphemus immediately moved the stone, but then blocked the entrance with…show more content…
Odysseus does this because he is prideful and haughty and wants Polyphemus to know who Odysseus was and that Odysseus defeated him. However, by doing so, he alerts Polyphemus of their location, and the cyclops hurls a massive boulder at the men, causing, “a giant wave that washed the ship stern foremost back to shore” (III: 484-485). This shows that Odysseus’ pride and honor which causes him to boast to others about his victories and their losses, is very dangerous to him and his crew. Instead of taking the easy way out, Odysseus decides to show off to the cyclops, who nearly washed them back to shore and kills them because of Odysseus’ foolish arrogance. Figurative Language: 1. Personification - “Dawn spread out her fingertips of rose” (III: 433). This example of personification explains the rising of the sun, which spreads red sunlight across the Earth like fingertips, gradually reaching forward over the horizon and onto the island of Polyphemus. It gives the sunlight (“Dawn”) the human-like quality of reaching out with fingertips. 2. Simile - “Like a charm the name deceived them” (III: 410). This simle compares the way that the false name, Nohbdy, that Polyphemus thought belonged to Odysseus, tricked the other cyclopses into believing that nobody harmed Polyphemus to a charm, which is extraordinary and amazing. By saying this, Odysseus is…show more content…
By singing beautifully, Circe attracted, and tempted, all the men to herself except for, “Eurylochus, who feared a snare” (IV: 563-564). This demonstrates how Eurylochus resisted temptation, which in turn, saved all of his men who were tricked by Circe’s enchanting sorcery and turned into pigs. Eurylochus stayed strong and ran to tell Odysseus, who stayed with and talked to Circe, eventually saving his men. If Eurylochus had fallen into the temptation like the rest of the men, they would all have been doomed and turned into
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