Theodicy In Revelation

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There are numerous references to chaos, destruction, death, and resurrection found within the pages of Revelation. A heavily symbolic book written by the believer John during his exile (exactly where is debated, though many believe it to be the island of Patmos), Revelation hints, through the use of metaphor, historical references, and prophecy, at the final days of the world. One of the passages of this Holy and strange book reads, “And in those days people will seek death and will not find it. They will long to die, but death will flee from them (Rev 20:5). While many theologians will look at this scripture in a symbolic manner, other, other, non religious individuals use this ideology for quite different means. More specifically, the idea…show more content…
Each of these bowls comes with a horrible consequence for the people of earth. While the actual results of these bowls differ from the literal direction taken in the television series, the concept itself is similar. Alan Bandy describes the fifth and sixth seals of Revelation, writing, “the …seals unleash horrible plagues upon the earth’s inhabitants” (106). While “the Walking Dead” does not literally have its characters breaking out in boils, when one considers the symbolic nature of the book of Revelation, there are more connections that one may see at first. When one looks at the first bowl not as a literal plague of boils, but a plague in general, a connections forms. There is a clear plague unleashed upon the earth in both Revelation and in “the Walking Dead.” Furthermore, there is a symbolic relation between the second and third bowls and the television series. Isbon Beckwith describes the consequences of these bowls in his commentary, writing, “the blood of the sea is here coagulated and decaying” (671). It is not secret that Revelation is a book containing a heavy use of symbolism. Henry Swete asserts in his commentary on Revelation, “the Apocalypse of John shares with other apocalyptic…show more content…
In terms of Revelation, transcendence is the idea that the next world (namely the spiritual world in terms of Revelation) is more real than the world in which humanity currently exists. The twenty-first chapter opens with the words, “Then I saw “a new heaven and a new earth,”[a] for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away” (Rev 21:1). Numerous times throughout the series, the audience is constantly reminded that this is the world in which the characters live now. Josué Aristides Diaz says, concerning the series, “the Walking Dead’ is a bleak look at the fragile foundations of American society” (Diaz, 263). In other words, it reveals how American society is it currently is will not hold up in the face of the new coming world. “The Walking Dead” hits this nail squarely on the head in several ways. For one, the show writers name the tenth episode of the sixth season “The Next New World,” symbolizing that the survivors are finally moving past what has happened, accepting that their “old Jerusalem” is gone for good. Throughout the series, the characters continue to discuss the changing of the world around them as they slowly adapt to the new world. One quote from Dale sums this up perfectly. “The world we know is gone.” This is fairly straightforward, emphasizing, just as Revelation discusses, the passing of the old world. In a later episode, Rick Grimes asserts to the
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