Theoretical Framework In Marketing

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Theoretical Framework Chapter two introduces the theories that are relevant to the purpose of this thesis. The following theories that are presented below are: consumer preferences, target group, brand, advertisement and sponsorship. Finally, the chapter ends with the analysis model and hypothesis. 2.1 Consumer Preferences The consumer market amounts to a total of 6.3 billion people, and thus there is great demand for an enormous variety of goods and services, especially as consumers differ from one another in that of age, gender, income, education level, and tastes. Moreover, the relationships between different consumers, as well as their contact with other elements of the world surroundings, affect their choice of products, services, and…show more content…
Some of these groups have a direct influence on a person, i.e. membership groups, groups that a person can belong to (Kotler et al. 2005), and reference groups which “serve as direct (face-to-face) or indirect points of comparison or reference in forming a person’s attitudes or beliefs” (Armstrong et al. 2005, p. 148). However, groups in which they do not belong to affect some people; these reference groups include aspirational groups, groups that a person desires to belong to and a fan’s admiration for an idol, etc. (Ibid). Finally, a wife, husband or a child has strong influences on a consumer and thus the family is the most vital consumer-buying organization in…show more content…
Moreover, depending on a person’s occupation and financial situation, as well as the stage in life a person is in, his/her demands for products shift. A person’s lifestyle forms his/her world and the way he/she decides to act, thus a person’s activities, interests, and opinions constitute their lifestyle, as well as affecting the choice of products (Armstrong et al. 2005). Moreover, all people are individual; hence have a unique personality of different characteristics, which is often portrayed with traits, such as self-confidence, dominance, sociability, autonomy, defensiveness, adaptability, and aggressiveness (Blackwell et al.
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