Theories Of Constructivism

832 Words4 Pages
Constructivism The theory of constructivism has its roots in psychology, philosophy, science and biology. It is a post-structuralist theory of evolution and development. The term ‘constructivism’ was coined by Jean Piaget. The theory deals with knowledge construction and learning and talks about how structures, language activity and meaning are developed. Cognitive development and deep understanding are the goals of constructivism. The two concepts that are featured prominently in this theory, learning and knowledge are interlinked. Learning is complex and is non – linear in nature. Learning is not a response to a stimulus. The learner plays an active part where through self- regulation and culturally developed tools and symbols they create…show more content…
Knowledge was once viewed as a collection of facts and information that was retrieved through rote memory. According to this theory, knowledge involves organizing information and forming conceptual foundation within which new knowledge can fit. One’s knowledge is never static, it is adaptive in nature and transforms with each new discovery. In order to ensure understanding, learners look for patterns within the realms of experience and develop personal explanations for natural phenomena and construct their own versions of reality. According to Piaget, the process of constructing knowledge involves organizing personal experiences in terms of preexisting mental schemes. Constructivism views learning as changes that happens in an individual through the processes of assimilation and accommodation.…show more content…
But then he realizes that there are differences and the truck does not fit into his classification framework. He has to develop a new framework to fit trucks. He accommodates his thinking to fit new information. This is accommodation. Whenever we encounter an idea or experience that does not fit into our existing framework, a state of cognitive imbalance or disequilibrium is created. The discomfort provokes us to change previous ways of thinking in order to establish balance between new knowledge and old knowledge. The current thinking is reorganized and new conceptual frameworks are developed to replace earlier ones. A preexisting schema is significantly changed or we construct a brand new schema. Constructivism in Education Constructivism encourages matching the child’s developmental level to the types of knowledge being taught and actively involving the learner. Students should have a contextually meaningful experience. The goal of constructivist learning is self-sufficiency, shared exchange of social relations and
Open Document