Theories Of Peacemaking Criminology

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What is peacemaking criminology? According to Klenoswki (2009), peacemaking criminology proposed a way in which the criminal justice system should view crime and punishment. This body of criminology provided a comprehensive model of how the ideologies and ethics of peace can be utilize as a foundation in providing justice. The root of nonviolent method to doing justice goes back thousands of years and it is best demonstrated in ancient values. The teachings of Taoists, Buddhists, Confucists, and others ideas laid the groundwork for what a lot people call the careful and nonviolent way of life. Peacemaking criminology has its root in a lot of philosophical, pedagogical, and religious ideas. However, the field of peacemaking criminology was invigorated…show more content…
The second reason for that is that the idea Peacemaking is a philosophy and it is not a viable criminological theory because it cannot be analyze and empirically tested. Martin (2001) opposes that the word ‘theory’ in peacemaking did not do this philosophy any justice in regard to descriptive and applied purposes. The issue with peacemaking as a theory is that the ideas of the peacemaking philosophy has it fundamental background to spiritual revolutions, connectedness, service and empathy for others, awareness, and peace are defined narrowly by academicians. Criminology has been publicized as an unbiased science, a means of accurately measuring crime and ways to deal with crime. Additionally, criminologists find it tremendously repulsive to hypothesize such philosophies as connectedness and spirituality. Consequently, peacemaking might not be a feasible theory in the traditional criminological. Since it is hard for traditional criminologist to accurately measure connectedness and spirituality, peacemaking is a mere philosophy of justice and it does not provide anything for policy because it cannot be analyzed or empirically tested (Martin,…show more content…
The third reason for that is that the peacemaking approach failed to provide a plan for personal and societal transformation. The peacemaking approach is rooted into anarchist and abolitionist theories of criminology. The school of anarchist and abolitionist theories both advocated a deconstruction of the existing governmental and criminal justice system. The peacemaking approach operates on the same notion of deconstruction; but provides a rudimentary ways provide for change. The biggest drawback of peacemaking criminology is that there is no concrete way that has been created to apply. Additionally, there is no physical discussion whatsoever of a strategy for inaugurating a system-wide modification or transformation of the existing criminal justice system; in fact, peacemaking criminologists provide imprecise suggestions about what should be done to modernize the justice system. In conclusion, peacemaking criminology ideology sounds astonishing in creating utopian but does not provide concrete evidence on how policymaker can utilize this idea into a policy to combat crime in our society (Klenoswki,
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