Theory Of Cohesion

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I. Theoretical Part 1- Scope of the study This study demonstrates the theory of cohesion in general. It tackles the use of cohesion in English written media discourse as its main focus. The writer conveys his ideas to the reader through creating a coherent text, so the reader can receive the message and make sense of the whole text. In order to produce such a coherent text the writer uses cohesion or cohesive ties (devices). The paper examines mainly the use of cohesive devices for achieving unity of the text by native American writer and another non-native Egyptian. The study shall show which of the two writers create more of less coherent texts. 2- Objectives of the study and research questions The objectives of the study are to find appropriate…show more content…
Application part The main source of the study is Halliday and Hasan's theory of cohesion. They introduced Cohesion for the first time in 1976. According to them "the concept of cohesion is a semantic one; it refers to relations of meaning that exist within the text, and that define it as a text"(1976, P.4). The unit of analysis for cohesion is called cohesive tie. By "tie" they mean "a term that refers to a single instance of cohesion; a term for one occurrence of a pair of cohesively related items. This we shall call a Tie…"(P.3). A tie is the tool that links the sentences to each other. Halliday and Hasan said that "some forms of cohesion are realized through the Grammar and other through the vocabulary". Thus they first divided cohesion into five main categories: reference, substitution, ellipsis, conjunction and lexical cohesion. Then they classified them to other broad categories: grammatical cohesion and lexical cohesion. Lexical cohesion is subdivided to reiteration and collocation. Each of these categories is classified in details with examples for each as follows: 1-Grammatical Cohesion explores the important ways that grammar holds texts together across sentence boundaries, it is subdivided…show more content…
additive: and, or, moreover, furthermore, similarly, in addition, alternatively, besides, or ,if not…then b. adversative: but, however, on the other hand, nevertheless, whereas, like, as if c. causal: so, because, since, therefore, by, thus, by this means, consequently, for this reason, it follows from this d. temporal: then, after that, an hour later, finally, at last, while, at the same time (Halliday and Hasan, 1976, p.228-231) 2- Lexical Cohesion Lexical cohesion is the second type of cohesion. It looks at the way of how aspects of vocabulary link parts of texts together, and how cohesion is achieved by "the selection of vocabulary". It occurs when two words in a text are semantically related in terms of their meaning. In his book, Jackson says:" Lexical devices of cohesion arise in large parts from the content of the text"(1992, p.255). The writer's choice of words effects in creating cohesion between sentences. There are two types of lexical cohesion can be distinguished by Halliday and Hasan: reiteration and collocation. 2.1. Reiteration, as explained by Renkema, includes not only repetition but also synonymy. Reiteration can also occur through the use of a word that is systematically linked to a previous one (1984, p.57). In general, reiteration is divided into the five following
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