Think Like A Freak Analysis

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I have been fascinated after getting the privilege to read the book, Think Like a Freak by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Having read the first five chapters, namely; What does it mean to think like a freak? The three hardest words in the English language, What’s your problem? , Like a bad dye job, The truth is in your roots and Think like a child respectively, I have been able to gain a different insight towards approaching challenges in life. The chapters are not only educative but also captivating, and therefore a review of the sections would be essential. In the first chapter, the writers illustrated what thinking like a freak means. Several arguments are presented among them being a compelling narrative of how a player will react during…show more content…
The authors argue that if the problem is framed incorrectly, a person may end up solving the wrong part of the problem. The proper phrasing of a problem led a Japanese guy called Kobi to comprehend that consuming a dog by dividing it into two was a successful strategy hence breaking his previous record and setting a new record. Kobi was successful in this attempt due to repeated experimentation and seeking feedback, and on top of all these, he refused to accept his previous limit as a barrier (Levitt, Dubner and Kobbe 29-35). I learned that if I should always set my problems in the right way to get the right solutions and limiting oneself with artificial barriers is a setback to finding the answer to a challenge. This situation is very application in various settings across the globe as most individuals do not see the solutions to problems as a result of approaching them the right way and limiting themselves through underestimating their potential and I entirely agree with the ideas presented in this chapter. I have also been a victim of handling challenges the wrong way and experiencing failure, but when I framed them correctly, I was able to obtain lasting…show more content…
A case where the ulcer treatment market was satisfied finding treatment for the symptoms of the disease rather than unraveling the source was proven wrong by Barry Marshal. The researchers argued that bacteria cannot survive in the stomach, but Barry proved them wrong by finding the root of the problem and solving it. He isolated the bacteria and swallowed it and was later diagnosed with the disease and this led to the researchers accepting that the gut bacteria have enormous implications on an individual 's health (Levitt, Dubner and Kobbe 36-46).The chapter discourages against gravitating towards the most obvious and the nearest solutions to a problem and encourages most people to be original thinkers when trying to solve difficulties in life. Most people especially students, like having the easy way out in solutions to problems and fail to engage their minds in coming up with solutions and this leads to lack of innovative thoughts as most of them rely on what has already been
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