Multaniques In Dattani's Dance Like A Man

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Mala’s father in Thirty Days in September also is a character who is absent. He fails to understand his wife’s agony and instead of talking to her about it, abandons her with his daughter, unknowingly pushing her into the same old life. Tara’s grandfather is a character who is not present in the play but plays a villainous and vital role in motivating his daughter Bharathi to take a drastic decision regarding the surgery of Tara and Chandan. Semi code refers to connotation within the story which enhances the meaning of the denotative meaning of the words.The very titles of the plays of Dattani Where There’s Will, Dance Like a Man, Bravely Fought the Queen, Tara, Final Solutions, On a Muggy Night in Mumbai and Thirty Days in September are pertinently…show more content…
As Multani observes, the simile contained in the title is suggestive of the central question put forward by the male protagonist, Jairaj, “is [if] he [can] dance like a man”, as the very notion of dance is opposed to that of maleness” (Deb…show more content…
When we think of dance, we immediately think of womanly grace. The titles have this dysfunctional quality worked out to a great extent through the characters. It is absolutely right for me if the title is something that resonates the conflict in the play! (Dhawan 144) Amritlal Parekh, the autocratic father, views Bharatnatyam as a “craft of prostitute to show off her wares”(CP137), and thus a man must never learn it, or whoever learns it ”could not be a man”(CP137). Jairaj is not allowed to dance and earn recognition as a good dancer by his own father and wife. It is only after his death that he is able to dance in peace and feel at one with God. He gains his real identity after his death. Performing arts is conventionally associated with femininity and therefore when Jairaj oversteps his jurisdiction by taking to dancing, his position is stigmatized for choosing a woman’s profession, though dancing is his way of self-expression and his only medium of discovering his identity. The gender constructs of society is made explicit through Amritlal’s statement that is central to the play, “A woman in a man’s world may be considered as being progressive. But a man in a woman’s world is pathetic” (CP 427). Thus the social bias against the art of dance is highlighted in the
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