Titus Livy's The History Of Rome

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At any given time in the history of humanity, their exist values. Value that represented the ideals of the civilization at any period. Values were representations of a period’s fears and aspirations, struggles and triumphs, nevertheless a unifying force, giving a civilization a way of approaching the world. Each approach changing from one period in history to the next. Ever changing values like that of the Greek who, following the victory in the Greco-Persian War, championed the Parthenon to be an ultimate representation of their values. Embracing humanism and rationality in every marble stone, the Parthenon breathed the ideals of the Greek. Tall Doric columns circumnavigate and support the temple; each column subtly curving with a stringent…show more content…
Romans abandoned individuality and preferred civility. Unlike the Greeks, whose city states constantly quarreled, the Romans were never as contentious. For the Romans adopted the idea of an afterlife, stressing present civil duty for a rich life after death. Even Roman historical text, such as Titus Livius’ The History of Rome from its Foundations, where Livy cautioned against those who disobey their civil duties. Within Livy’s book a story is told of a brave young man T. Manlius sent to scout the enemy along with his men, but urged not to engage by the Roman consul. Manlius impale General Geminus Maecius and brings his dead body to his father. His father disappointed in his disobedience, presents him to the authorities who beheaded Manlius for going against military…show more content…
Individualism was completely snuffed during the medieval period. Humanistic ideals of man being of great capability were snuffed out. For example, an expert from Pope Innocent the third’s On the Misery of the Human Condition says “He commits depraved acts by which he offends God, his neighbor, and himself, shameful acts by which he defiles his name, his person, and his conscience; and vain acts by which he ignores all things important, useful, and necessary. That letter was meant to be read by every church. When the Bubonic plague hit, a new change in values occurred. With millions dying, the now less plentiful peasant realized they had more bargaining power. Peasants demand more from their rulers or began leaving there lords and going to more plentiful places for work. A middle class began to develop, and along with the Magna Carta, the middle class had representation in politics. People began to value their selves more. The renaissance began. Inspired by Greek and Roman values, a spur of humanism flooded urban areas. People and their capabilities became the center of attention once again. Art stopped focusing only on Religion, but rather on the capabilities of man. Along with the Roman Catholic Church’s decline a secular air developed. Religion was now superficial. People were become more concerned with the pursuit of money and leisure, rather than the strict obligations of the middle
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