Feminism In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Feminism, to put it simply, is the equality among genders and sexes. This movement is made to include every single person to every single aspect in life without exceptions. “To Kill A Mockingbird” demonstrate different features of feminism, from misogyny to the patriarchic system in which society mostly accept and where they functions, it all connects and ties into the novel and life itself. This idea comes from the author’s childhood and the environment where she grew up in, “To Kill A Mockingbird” is a novel of historical fiction written by Harper Lee and was first published in the year 1960’s. Beloved by a lot of readers (winning many awards including Pulitzer Prize in the year 1961), Lee’s only novel has portrayed her own childhood life,…show more content…
As Scout subconsciously learns all that there is in the real world, she received messages primarily from her aunt and some of her female neighbors, telling that she is falling behind of her assigned sexuality. Gender roles were firmly established for men and women. Women were supposed to be quiet, calm, child bearers and naturally dumb while men were the strong, smart, working people. The patriarchic views which spread all throughout the society stopped women from behaving in anyway like being masculine and such. Lee broke these stereotypes, making herself as a “tomboy”. This characterization of her childhood self is shown through Scout. Scout was introduced as an intelligent and “inqurious?” tomboy where she usually hangs out with her brother Jem –Jeremy Atticus Finch— and their friend Dill –Charles Baker Harris— and was known for her vicious fights with boys older or smaller than…show more content…
These things are reflected within her only novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by the character of Scout Finch and through the relationships between men and women characters. The way female and male treated each other and were portrayed in her childhood society is also connected with the actions of female and male within the novel. It is truly vital that we notice these differences through a feminist lens, as they bind the whole book together and help us make connections between beliefs and what it
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