To Kill A Mockingbird Pride Quotes

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Pride holds strong inside of us whether good or bad people will always fight tooth and nail to keep their morals in check. The places we live, people we surround ourselves with and the choices we make are all impacted by our pride and when we take a moment to look around our own community, we see what matters to us and how our life forms around it. The southern town of Maycomb is no different, we see a story. A story of the precious dignity of the human race and the role it plays in a community. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee demonstrates how a controlled pride is beneficial to society through the use of characters, conflicts, and settings. Evidently, our dignity is an enormous part of our personality. When our thoughts and actions …show more content…

For instance, Scout is shown to have an unwavering pride in herself and her father as she beats up Francis after having “called Atticus something”(Lee 98). Scout even went as far to explain that she’ll “swear before God” before she lets someone speak ill of her family (98). When confronted with situations that hurt her pride, she loses her head and will do anything to get revenge. Her character’s personality primarily is egotistical. Lee strategically included Scouts enormous moral compass to suggest that even those with good intentions must learn to stay in control of their emotions. Equally important is the character Atticus, he is a hallmark of a controlled pride. His decision to take on the Tom Robinson case was risky but he knows that he “couldn’t face [his] children otherwise”(100). Atticus proves again that he is prideful when even after being threatened by Bob Ewell he “strolled on” and later explains that in taking the wrath of Mr. Ewell he …show more content…

What we believe in has an enormous influence on everything we do, and sometimes this can lead to problems. The conflicts in the novel and the characters interactions, help to build an understanding of why our pride is important to society. A central conflict in To Kill a Mockingbird is the implied interaction between Mayella and her father after being caught kissing Tom. Atticus asks the simple question “didn’t Bob Ewell beat you up?” to which she doesn’t respond, Mayella also had “her right eye… blackened” something only someone left handed like her father could have done(213, 200). The beating of Mayella was a consequence of Bob Ewell’s deep prejudice that black men are inferior to white men. As a result of one man’s pride a young woman put in a horrible position. The conflict makes it is easy to see the need for our world to understand and control our pride in instances where it is at stake. Another conflict in the novel is centered around a person’s pride being broken, as Jem loses his temper with Mrs. Dubose. Mrs.Dubose made rude remarks about Scout's “overalls” and his fathers “Lawing for” Black people(117). The statements were enough to break his promise to “just be a gentleman” and he “cut the tops off every Camelia bush” in her garden(118). Jem had a moment of weakness when his pride for his family was at stake. His shift in judgment during the situation caused for an

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